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magical mystical medieval rye

curl left 28thday ofJulyin the year2011 curl right
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   Another of Mermaid Street. The protruding, oval-shaped white sign on the right marks Jeake’s House. 
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   Another of Mermaid Street. The protruding, oval-shaped white sign on the right marks Jeake’s House. 

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   Swan Cottage Tea Rooms on The Mint
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   Swan Cottage Tea Rooms on The Mint

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   At the bottom of Mermaid Street is Oak Corner House and Trader’s Passage going off to the right. Trader’s Passage will take you up to Watchbell Lane. There are a zillion little passageways and alleys here.
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   At the bottom of Mermaid Street is Oak Corner House and Trader’s Passage going off to the right. Trader’s Passage will take you up to Watchbell Lane. There are a zillion little passageways and alleys here.

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   Another of The Mermaid Inn
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   Another of The Mermaid Inn

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   Simon the Pieman's tea shoppe and Fletcher’s House, once home to Jacobean playwright  John Fletcher.
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   Simon the Pieman's tea shoppe and Fletcher’s House, once home to Jacobean playwright John Fletcher.

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   View from St. Mary’s Church across the red rooftops of Rye. This is from UGAgardener on flickr
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   View from St. Mary’s Church across the red rooftops of Rye. This is from UGAgardener on flickr

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   ”The Standard Inn” on The Mint. These photos I don’t have credits for are most likely to be from louiseandcolin’s photostream on flickr, or UGAGardener’s photostream on flickr. I pillage them a lot. They have AMAZING RYE IMAGES.
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   ”The Standard Inn” on The Mint. These photos I don’t have credits for are most likely to be from louiseandcolin’s photostream on flickr, or UGAGardener’s photostream on flickr. I pillage them a lot. They have AMAZING RYE IMAGES.

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   Watchbell Street.
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   Watchbell Street.

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enchantedengland:  Beachy Head (East Sussex, southern coastal England) is the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain, rising to 162 m (530 feet) above sea level. The name Beachy Head actually has nothing to do with a beach- it appears first as ‘Beauchef’ in 1274, which evolved into Beachy Head- a corruption of the original French words for “beautiful headland”.

   The prominence of Beachy Head has unfortunately made it a suicide hotspot since the seventeenth century; with about 20 persons per year hurtling themselves off the cliff. The Beachy Head  Chaplaincy Team conducts regular patrols of the area to locate and stop potential leapers, and their salutatory efforts have met with good success. However, if you are merely enjoying the breathtaking view, do not sit alone looking morose or burst into tears at the wonder of creation because someone may sit down and counsel you.  This is my #2 spot after Rye on the Where-I-Shall-Go-In-Sussex list; and I definitely will not be jumping because it will be one of the best days of my life. I might get too close to the edge and fall, though. (image from flickr and I apologize for not writing down from WHO. I got excited over the picture)
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enchantedengland:  Beachy Head (East Sussex, southern coastal England) is the highest chalk sea cliff in Britain, rising to 162 m (530 feet) above sea level. The name Beachy Head actually has nothing to do with a beach- it appears first as ‘Beauchef’ in 1274, which evolved into Beachy Head- a corruption of the original French words for “beautiful headland”.

   The prominence of Beachy Head has unfortunately made it a suicide hotspot since the seventeenth century; with about 20 persons per year hurtling themselves off the cliff. The Beachy Head Chaplaincy Team conducts regular patrols of the area to locate and stop potential leapers, and their salutatory efforts have met with good success. However, if you are merely enjoying the breathtaking view, do not sit alone looking morose or burst into tears at the wonder of creation because someone may sit down and counsel you.  This is my #2 spot after Rye on the Where-I-Shall-Go-In-Sussex list; and I definitely will not be jumping because it will be one of the best days of my life. I might get too close to the edge and fall, though. (image from flickr and I apologize for not writing down from WHO. I got excited over the picture)

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enchantedengland:  “Doors of Rye” six of an endless number of bewitching portals in that most enchantingly-wonderful-and-wizardy village in East Sussex (on the southern coast of England.) Henry James, who lived in Lamb House here, described Rye as “a little old cobble-stoned, grass-grown, red-roofed town, on the summit of its pyramidal hill.” Next week I’ll do a Read More about Rye and fascinate you further with details of its infinite wonders, but don’t be too impatient. Just carry on with your life as you normally would. (image by CAGW on Flickr)
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enchantedengland “Doors of Rye” six of an endless number of bewitching portals in that most enchantingly-wonderful-and-wizardy village in East Sussex (on the southern coast of England.) Henry James, who lived in Lamb House here, described Rye as “a little old cobble-stoned, grass-grown, red-roofed town, on the summit of its pyramidal hill.” Next week I’ll do a Read More about Rye and fascinate you further with details of its infinite wonders, but don’t be too impatient. Just carry on with your life as you normally would. (image by CAGW on Flickr)

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